An Illinois labor board declared Tuesday that Gov. Bruce Rauner and the state’s largest employee union are at an impasse in negotiations, clearing the way for the Republican governor to attempt to impose his terms on a new contract.

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Adam
3 years ago

Please respond Mark,

I saw a comment you left on Tribune about the budget. You said there is no solution to be had, and I tend to agree. But, what happens in the end then? When does it all collapse, and how, so that something truly can be done? We know the pensions are doomed in the end. Where does this all lead at the end?

Mike
3 years ago
Reply to  Adam
Adam
3 years ago
Reply to  Mike

That doesn’t answer my question, and you are not Mark. Madigan cannot and will not fix what will happen in the end anyway.

Mike
3 years ago
Reply to  Adam

Michael Madigan is the biggest factor in what has occurred and what will occur. Understanding and explaining to others what has transpired, understanding and explaining explaining alternatives, reigning in Madigan’s power, winning battles against Madigan, outmaneuvering Madigan, etc. are all critical factors in fixing the mess. There are an infinite number of potential outcomes. How it plays out depends on what happens at the Federal, state, and local levels, among politicians, voters, taxpayers, government units, government employees, lobbyists, unions, judges, lawyers, policy, state law, federal law, state constitution, US constitution, etc. Theoretically, there is enough money to pay for pensions… Read more »

Adam
3 years ago
Reply to  Mike

Madigan will be dead or retired by the time the state collapses, and it will in 5 to 7 years. There are no realistic combination of cuts or taxes that can fix Illinois. Most likely Illinois will force the federal government to allow state bankruptcy in the future, the pensions will run out of money totally and force change, or both.

J.A. Herzrent
3 years ago
Reply to  Mike

Theoretically there was enough land in Europe to satisfy Hitler’s demand for lebensraum. Theoretically, there’s enough water in Lake Michigan to hydrate Arizona and the Sahara desert. Theoreticallly, there are enough voters in Illinois to elect legislators and officials who can fairly balance the expectations of taxpayers and public employees. Theoretically, public employees should receive fair wages and those who retire should receive fair pensions while taxpayers should pay a fair amount for public services. It now appears that the cost of pensions was under-estimated and that the “workers” received higher salaries than the government could afford to pay. The… Read more »

Mike
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Glennon

Well, I followed it up by, will voters tolerate the tax hikes and opportunity costs.

It seems tax hikes hits more of a raw nerve than salary and benefit hikes.

J.A. Herzrent
3 years ago
Reply to  Mike

Mike: I was trying to agree with you and then some. Infinite revenue solves all problems of government expenditure. Reality is more challenging and I often wonder if our politics and economy are tuned-in to reality other than when the system gridlocks.

Adam
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Glennon

But this cannot go on forever Mark; some sort of collapse is on its way if nothing changes. In the end, the pensions will fail for sure with no changes.

Adam
3 years ago
Reply to  Mark Glennon

The slow burn has been going on for a while in Illinois; it will not last much longer. The fact is that the global economy is in worse shape than Illinois, and that is scary.